• Random Movie Quote

    Sir Alexander Dane: You’re just going to have to figure out what it wants. What is its motivation?
    Jason Nesmith: It’s a rock monster. It doesn’t have motivation.
    Sir Alexander Dane: See, that’s your problem, Jason. You were never serious about the craft.

    — Galaxy Quest (1999)

The Infinite Upgrade

You may have noticed that I have an online store installed in the site now. I do not have any products available yet, though. I am still exploring the store software to make sure it does what I want it to do. Hence, the delay. I’ll be adding the free products to it as soon as I determine that this is the store for me. Fortunately, WordPress has a large variety of them.

One of the problems faced by game publishers is the issue of revising their products. The first batch of a released game may contain typos or bad rules that slipped by them during the development process. The customer then has to deal with integrating errata into the product they purchased or buying a revised edition with the mistakes corrected. With paper products, this situation is unavoidable, but it does leave a bad taste in the mouth.

I still remember purchasing a D20 product from a now-defunct game company at Gen Con. After I had my credit card processed, the booth volunteer slapped a label on the inside of the book that stated that I had bought the book with the understanding that the vehicle section of the rules were missing. This omission was never mentioned to me before I bought the book, and I immediately asked for my money back. They lost a sale that day because they had sold me an incomplete product and hadn’t seen fit to tell me until after they had my money.

I don’t want anything like that to happen to my customers. Fortunately, electronic products make it so much easier to correct mistakes. Which brings up the point of this post – The Infinite Upgrade.

Some of the games I put up for sale on this site may be Beta versions.
They should be playable, but may not be pretty. There may be some bad rules that need correcting. They would also be sold for a low price. Why sell them instead of giving them away for free? To help fund the next version of that product. If you buy a product from this site, I want you, the early adopter, to be able to get the next electronic version for free. Those of you that wait would need to pay the higher price for the finished product. Even then, if there are any corrections or revisions made, those customers can download those versions at no cost.

Think of it as a Kickstarter plan with an instant payout and infinite stretch goals.

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